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The mirror in the roadway literature and the real world by Morris Dickstein

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Published by Princeton University Press in Princeton, NJ .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Literature, Modern -- 20th century -- History and criticism

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementDickstein, Morris.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPN771 .D55 2004
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3307608M
ISBN 100691119961
LC Control Number2004053514

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In a famous passage in The Red and the Black, the French writer Stendhal described the novel as a mirror being carried along a the twentieth century this was derided as a naive notion of realism. Instead, modern writers experimented with creative forms of invention and dislocation/5(1). Twenty illuminating essays published over the decades on literature’s elusive, prophetic interpretations of a changing American society. In his title piece, Dickstein (Distinguished Professor of English/CUNY Graduate Center; Double Agent: The Critic and Society, , etc.) explains that the “mirror in the roadway” reflects Stendhal’s metaphor in Le Rouge et le noir that a novel is. The Mirror In The Roadway; A Study Of The Modern Novel book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.4/5(1). In a famous passage in The Red and the Black, the French writer Stendhal described the novel as a mirror being carried along a roadway. In the twentieth century this was derided as a naïve notion of realism. Instead, modern writers experimented with creative forms of invention and dislocation. Deconstructive theorists went even further, questioning whether literature had any real reference to.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: vii, , vi pages 23 cm: Contents: Part I Forerunners --Preliminary --Jane Austen: The Flight from Fancy --Stendhal: The Flight from Reality --Part II The Distorting Mirror --The Second phase --Dickens: The Instrusion of the Audience --Balzac: The Boundaries of Science --Gogol's Shoe --Thackeray: Vanity Fair --Part III.   The book takes its title from a phrase in Stendhal’s The Red and the Black, in which a novel is likened to a mirror that reflects the “road” of life. For the most part, Dickstein assumes that this fictionalization of the real world is a valuable exercise, even one with intrinsic moral value.5/5. Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc: Additional Physical Format: Online version: O'Connor, Frank, Mirror in the roadway. New York, Knopf, Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for A Mirror in the Roadway: Literature and the Real World at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.3/5.

This perceptive and stimulating volume of essays on 19th century novelists originated in lectures given at Harvard's summer school. Revised and expanded, and ably introduced by a preliminary essay on the role of the novel as an art form, this constitutes a truly original and provocative contribution to literary criticism. O'Connor's thesis is that the 19th century novel is ""incomparably the. This book is substantially a series of lectures delivered at Harvard Summer School in and I have published them because it seems to me that, whatever their faults, they fill a gap and attempt to cover a great art otherwise covered only in sections, as in the little book which I might describe as my inspiration for attempting the subject at all--Lord David Cecil's Early Victorian. Lee Friedlander, Route 9W, New York State, , from the book under discussion Near the end of his book In the Picture: Self-Portraits , Lee Friedlander inserts an epigraph he attributes to César Vichard de Saint Réal (): “A novel is a mirror passing down a road.”The source of this quote is another epigraph — the one with which Stendhal begins chapter 13 of The Red. In a famous passage in The Red and the Black, the French writer Stendhal described the novel as a mirror being carried along a roadway. In the twentieth century this was derided as a naive notion of realism. Instead, modern writers experimented with creative forms of invention and dislocation. Deconstructive theorists went even further, questioning whether literature had any real reference to.